855-266-9595
Alcoholism & Addiction

Editorials Address Need for More Research, Restrictions Against Alcohol Industry

Alcohol companies are sending out the wrong message, say experts, and it’s time to stop. Tobacco receives worldwide attention for detrimental effects on health, and its marketing approach toward teens is closely monitored. Products from major pharmaceutical companies are the subject of numerous research studies geared toward how the public views the medications and uses them. Now experts are calling for the same attention to the marketing of alcohol products and the harmful effects caused by alcohol in an attempt to reduce illness, addiction and fatalities associated with the substance.

U.K. reports that the government is too much aligned with alcohol messaging and manufacturing continues to influence a new focus on alcohol, including citing campaigns that poise alcohol as having health benefits and cast aside its dangers. Other experts point out that scientific research to back any positive claims toward alcohol is lacking, and that the message that alcohol could improve health is escalated by manufactures. Campaigns geared toward youth drinking are also a focus of new scrutiny.

Editors at PLoS Medicine are speaking out against the campaign strategies used by alcohol companies and the organizations that stand behind them, according to a ScienceDaily posting. They are calling for more research into the effects of alcohol and a closer examination at how the public perceives consuming alcohol.

Among their recommendations are outlawing the use of alcohol ads for sporting venues, tighter controls over ads, new pricing levels and further regulated access to alcohol. Additionally, they are calling for enhanced safety labels that will be more visible and more effective. Community and legislative action are also a focus of recent editorials for to help improve and preserve public health pertaining to alcohol consumption.

Comments are closed.

Addiction Resource: Alcohol Substance Abuse | Subscribe to Substance Abuse RSS | Photo Disclaimer | xml sitemap